Teacher scorned for porn

Posted by
Pin It

 

Stacie Halas has a past. It’s not a favorable one, but it is a past like any one of us could have. Her present, at least up until this past April, was working as an eight-grade science teacher at Richard B. Haydock Intermediate School for the Oxnard (Cal.) School District.

 

This has suddenly changed.

 

Someone saw her past self on screen, most likely in some sort of illegal fashion.

 

Whoever this human catalyst was didn’t really see Halas; they saw Tiffany Six, which popular website Jezebel.com informs us was her name back in her adult entertainment days. They recognized her and realized someone they knew was in a pornographic movie.

 

According to the Associated Press, students alerted school officials of Halas’ former job by showing photos and videos of the teacher on their smartphones. Halas was put on leave, since it was decided she was inept at her job due to the ghosts in her past.

 

She has lost her original appeal to return back to teaching, a decision made by a Commission on Professional Competence (a three-judge panel), and can appeal again by taking it to the Ventura County Superior Court.

 

Why she would want to do this is another issue entirely. Whether we like it or not, porn is out there. Though the Internet can link its creation back to progress in military technology, porn and the Internet have woven a braid together since the latter became available to the public in the early 1990’s. It seems to be around us at all times of the day, just waiting for its chance to slip through our web filters.

 

So should a past life working in the porn industry condemn someone from having any other profession? I believe it really boils down to the individual ethics of it all, well at least I think so, maybe your ethics make it different to you all.

 

See what I did there? Do ya? Do ya? No? Maybe? I digress. To go back to my point though, it makes sense that we wouldn’t feel comfortable with a former porn star teaching our children, present or future, even if some of us would be thrilled to go to that Parent-Teacher conference to tell all of our friends.

 

 

The question remains: should we care what Halas, or Tiffany Six, did in her past?

 

“Halas did not star in pornographic movies while teaching in any district. She took parts only during an eight-month period from 2005 to 2006 because of financial problems after her boyfriend abandoned her,” Halas’ lawyer Richard Schwab said to the Huffington Post.

 

Sure, this is a story we hear from pretty much everyone who has ever worked in the porn industry, but that doesn’t make it untrue. I am sure it was the quickest way to get money outside of prostitution.

 

Here’s my argument. It is people getting paid to have sex in the most perverted sense of the word, because it isn’t one person paying another — though that may be the theme of many porno movies — it is people getting paid so thousands if not millions in some cases can watch their exploits.

 

Yes, the definition of the word disagrees with me, but the term was created before video cameras and the internet, so I am sure the Geneva Convention for the word prostitution would now have to include pornographic materials.

 

With that being said, does Halas deserve to lose her job? Yes. Here’s why.

 

Halas is working in a time her videos can be available to anyone who goes to see them. With that alone, her ability to teach and form young, impressionable minds gets thrown out like a giant Hefty bag of garbage.

 

Especially since Halas teaches at the middle school level, where hormones are flying around and confused like a bee in a field full of flowers for the first time. Having a teacher whom you can see naked would just be too much to handle.

 

To put it into official terms, this is a statement made by Judge Julie Cabos-Owen, one of the three judges on the panel for the Commission of Professional Competence:

 

“Although her [Halas’] pornography career has concluded, the ongoing availability of her pornographic materials on the Internet will continue to impede her from being an effective teacher and respected colleague,” Cabus-Owens said in the 46-page decision made earlier this month.

 

Your Honor, once you say that, I have to agree.